2timothy

2 Tim. 3:1 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Modesty

But as the conquering power of things evil is on the increase-which is the characteristic of the last times[2]

2 Tim. 3:1 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Fasting

Grant that from the time of John the Paraclete had grown mute; we ourselves would have arisen as prophets to ourselves, for this cause chiefly: I say not now to bring down by our prayers God's anger, nor to obtain his protection or grace; but to secure by premunition the moral position of the "latest times; "[92]

2 Tim. 3:1 - NIV, NAB - in Hippolytus Dogmatical and Historical Fragments

As these things, then, are in the future, and as the ten toes of the image are equivalent to (so many) democracies,[68]

2 Tim. 3:1 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Treatise I On the Unity of the Church

but they shall proceed no further, for their folly shall be manifest unto all men, even as theirs also was."[49]

2 Tim. 3:2 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book I

Such are the Greeks, "lovers of their own selves, and boasters."[199]

2 Tim. 3:3 - NIV, NAB - in Constitutions of the Holy Apostles Book II

Wherefore henceforward it will be free from blame and reproach, and become clear of such wicked, deceitful, abusive, unmerciful, traitorous persons; of such as are "haters of those that are good, lovers of pleasure,"[206]

2 Tim. 3:4 - NIV, NAB - in Epistle of Ignatius to the Magnesians

who are "lovers of pleasure, and not lovers of God, having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof."[62]

2 Tim. 3:4 - NIV, NAB - in Alexander Epistles on the Arian Heresy

They go about the cities, attempting nothing else but that under the mark of friendship and the name of peace, by their hypocrisy and blandishments, they may give and receive letters, to deceive by means of these a few "silly women, and laden with sins, who have been led captive by them,"[42]

2 Tim. 3:5 - NIV, NAB - in The First Epistle of Clement Concerning Virginity

For such persons as these "have the appearance only of the fear of God, but the power of it they deny."[16]

2 Tim. 3:5 - NIV, NAB - in Pope Anterus The Epistle

Now for both parties-namely, for those who endure a famine of the word of God, and for bishops who endure straits, when they are installed in other cities for the common good -no small degree of mercy is shown. And they who deny this, although they have the form of godliness, do yet deny the power thereof.[10]

2 Tim. 3:6 - NIV, NAB - in Epistle of Ignatius to the Philadelphians

For there are many wolves that appear worthy of credit, who, by means of a pernicious pleasure, carry captive[9]

2 Tim. 3:6 - NIV, NAB - in Epistle of Ignatius to the Philadelphians

who, by means of a pernicious pleasure, carry captive[12]

2 Tim. 3:6 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book I

Such are the words and deeds by which, in our own district of the Rhone, they have deluded many women, who have their consciences seared as with a hot iron.[172]

2 Tim. 3:6 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book VI

we have fallen in with this diagram, and we have found in it the representations of men who, as Paul says, "creep into houses, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts; ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth."[134]

2 Tim. 3:6 - NIV, NAB - in Archelaus Acts of the Disputation with the Heresiarch Manes

How, then, does this man stand up and try, to persuade us to emigrate his opinions, importuning every individual whom he meets to become a Manichaean, and going about and creeping into houses, and endeavouring to deceive minds laden with sins?[401]

2 Tim. 3:7 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book IV

For, being driven away from Him who truly is [God], and being turned backwards, he shall be for ever seeking, yet shall never find out God;[115]

2 Tim. 3:7 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book V

Now, such are all the heretics, and those who imagine that they have hit upon something more beyond the truth, so that by following those things already mentioned, proceeding on their way variously, in harmoniously, and foolishly, not keeping always to the same opinions with regard to the same things, as blind men are led by the blind, they shall deservedly fall into the ditch of ignorance lying in their path, ever seeking and never finding out the truth.[175]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Idolatry

So, too, that other species of magic which operates by miracles, emulous even in opposition to Moses,[54]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book IV

, he quotes also a narrative regarding Jesus-without, however, mentioning His name-and gives it an allegorical signification, whether successfully or the reverse I may state on another occasion. He relates also the account respecting Moses, and Jannes, and Jambres.[242]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Archelaus Acts of the Disputation with the Heresiarch Manes

And yet beyond that he shall proceed no further; for his folly shall be made manifest to all men, as was the case with Jamnes and Mambres.[381]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Archelaus Acts of the Disputation with the Heresiarch Manes

For, every object that withstands, withstands not itself, but some other one, either better or worse; as Paul also gives us to understand when he writes in the following terms in his second Epistle to Timothy: "As Jamnes and Mambres withstood Moses, so have these also resisted the truth: men of corrupt mind, reprobate concerning the faith. But they shall proceed no further: for their folly is manifest unto all men, as theirs also was."[551]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Constitutions of the Holy Apostles Book VIII

The one was resisted by Jannes and Jambres, the other by Annas and Caiaphas.[12]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Gospel of Nicodemus I The Acts of Pilate

And there were there Jannes and Jambres, servants of Pharaoh, and they also did not a few of the miracles which Moses did; and the Egyptians took them to be gods-this Jannes and this Jambres.[22]

2 Tim. 3:8 - NIV, NAB - in Pope Anterus The Epistle

not lawful, and what is not lawful is lawful. Even as Jannes and Mambres[6]

2 Tim. 3:11 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on John Book I

"So I ordain in all the churches," and[16]

2 Tim. 3:12 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Treatise VII On the Mortality

It disturbs some that this mortality is common to us with others; and yet what is there in this world which is not common to us with others, so long as this flesh of ours still remains, according to the law of our first birth, common to us with them? So long as we are here in the world, we are associated with the human race in fleshly equality,[16]

2 Tim. 3:12 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book X

"For all that will to live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution."[122]

2 Tim. 3:13 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Treatise VI On the Vanity of Idols

These spirits, therefore, are lurking under the statues and consecrated images: these inspire the breasts of their prophets with their afflatus, animate the fibres of the entrails, direct the flights of birds, rule the lots, give efficiency to oracles, are always mixing up falsehood with truth, for they are both deceived and they deceive;[10]

2 Tim. 3:15 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Exhortation to the Heathen

"Thou, O Timothy," he says, "from a child hast known the holy letters, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation, through faith that is in Christ Jesus."[113]

2 Tim. 3:16 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Exhortation to the Heathen

For truly holy are those letters that sanctify and deify; and the writings or volumes that consist of those holy letters and syllables, the same apostle consequently calls "inspired of God, being profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished to every good work."[114]

2 Tim. 3:16 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On the Apparel of Women Book I

us; and we read that "every Scripture suitable for edification is divinely inspired.[31]

2 Tim. 3:16 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on John Book I

Consider on this point the language of St. Paul. When he declares that[13]