romans

Rom. 14:1 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book I

Celsus introduces the Jew disputing with Jesus, I resolved to prefix this preface to the beginning (of the treatise), in order that the reader of our reply to Celsus might fall in with it first, and see that this book has been composed not for those who are thorough believers, but for such as are either wholly unacquainted with the Christian faith, or for those who, as the apostle terms them, are "weak in the faith; "regarding whom he says, "Him that is weak in the faith receive ye."[13]

Rom. 14:1 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Epistle LXXIII

If, then, she is the beloved and spouse who alone is sanctified by Christ, and alone is cleansed by His washing, it is manifest that heresy, which is not the spouse of Christ, nor can be cleansed nor sanctified by His washing, cannot bear sons to God.[15]

Rom. 14:2 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book VI

"Now the weak eateth herbs," according to the noble apostle.[4]

Rom. 14:2 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XII

worthy of the good cheer and reception which Abraham gave at the weaning of his son, would seek here and in every Scripture food which is different, I think, from that which is meat, indeed, but is not solid food, and from what are figuratively called herbs, which are food to one who has been weaned and is not yet strong but weak, according to the saying, "He that is weak eateth herbs."[206]

Rom. 14:3 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria The Instructor Book II

"Let him who eateth, not despise him who eateth not; and let him who eateth not, not judge him who eateth."[26]

Rom. 14:3 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

"Qui" itaque "non comedit, comedentem ne spernat. Qui autem comedit, eum qui non comedit non judicet: Deus enim ipsum accepit."[71]

Rom. 14:4 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Modesty

For `to his own lord a man standeth or falleth; who art thou, to judge another's servant? '[25]

Rom. 14:4 - NIV, NAB - in Hippolytus Refutation of All Heresies Book IX

: "Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? "[56]

Rom. 14:4 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Epistle LI

and in another place he says, "Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? To his own master he standeth or falleth; yea, he shall stand, for God is able to make him stand."[31]

Rom. 14:4 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Treatise XII Three Books of Testimonies Against the Jews

Of this same subject to the Romans: "Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? to his own master he standeth or falleth. But he shall stand; for God is able to make him stand."[533]

Rom. 14:4 - NIV, NAB - in A Treatise Against the Heretic Novatian by an Anonymous Bishop

And yet thou, O Novatian, judgest and declarest that the lapsed have no hope of peace and mercy, nor inclinest thine ear to the rebuke of the apostle, when he says," Who art thou, who judgest another man's servant? To his own master he standeth or falleth. Yea, he shall stand. God is mighty to establish him."[39]

Rom. 14:6 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria The Instructor Book II

And a little way on he explains the reason of the command, when he says, "He that eateth, eateth to the Lord, and giveth God thanks; and he that eateth not, to the Lord he eateth not, and giveth God thanks."[27]

Rom. 14:9 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book III

And he renders the reason why the Son of God did these things, saying, "For to this end Christ both lived, and died, and revived, that He might rule over the living and the dead."[328]

Rom. 14:9 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book II

: "For to this end Christ died, and rose again, that He might be Lord both of the `dead and living.'"[166]

Rom. 14:9 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

The saint says at the end: The words, "For to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that He might be Lord both of the dead and living,"[119]

Rom. 14:9 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on John Book VI

" He, then, who is able worthily to set forth the meaning of these two journeys is able to untie the latchet of the shoes of Jesus; he, bending down in his mind and going with Jesus as He goes down into Hades, and descending from heaven and the mysteries of Christ's deity to the advent He of necessity made with us when He took on man (as His shoes). Now He who put on man also put on the dead, for[106]

Rom. 14:10 - NIV, NAB - in Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians

for we are before the eyes of our Lord and God, and "we must all appear at the judgment-seat of Christ, and must every one give an account of himself."[40]

Rom. 14:12 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Epistle LXXV

I have replied, dearest son, to your letter, so far as my poor ability prevailed; and I have shown, as far as I could, what I think; prescribing to no one, so as to prevent any prelate from determining what he thinks right, as he shall give an account of his own doings to the Lord, according to what the blessed Apostle Paul in his Epistle to the Romans writes and says: "Every one of us shall give account for himself: let us not therefore judge one another."[37]

Rom. 14:13 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian To His Wife Book II

marriages, put "an occasion of falling"[3]

Rom. 14:14 - NIV, NAB - in Arnobius Against the Heathen Book VII

sucklings that he may digest them more speedily?[91]

Rom. 14:15 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book III

" And everywhere, when [referring to] the passion of our Lord, and to His human nature, and His subjection to death, he employs the name of Christ, as in that passage: "Destroy not him with thy meat for whom Christ died."[335]

Rom. 14:15 - NIV, NAB - in A Letter from Origen to Africanus

we notice such things, we are forthwith to reject as spurious the copies in use in our Churches, and enjoin the brotherhood to put away the sacred books current among them, and to coax the Jews, and persuade them to give us copies which shall be untampered with, and free from forgery! Are we to suppose that that Providence which in the sacred Scriptures has ministered to the edification of all the Churches of Christ, had no thought for those bought with a price, for whom Christ died;[4]

Rom. 14:15 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book VIII

and again, "Destroy not him with thy meat, for whom Christ died; "[55]

Rom. 14:15 - NIV, NAB - in The Second Epistle of Clement Concerning Virginity

For "if for the sake of meat our brother be made sad, or shocked, or made weak, or caused to stumble, we are not walking in the love of God. For the sake of meat thou causest him to perish for whose sake Christ died."[23]

Rom. 14:16 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria The Instructor Book II

"Let not, then, your good be evil spoken of; for the kingdom of God is not meat and drink," says the apostle, in order that the meal spoken of may not be conceived as ephemeral, "but righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost."[12]

Rom. 14:17 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Quomodo ergo esuriunt, et sitiunt, et camis patiuntur affectiones, et alia, quae non patietur, qui per Christum accepit perfectam, quae speratur, resurrectionem? Quin etiam ii, qui colunt idola, a cibis et venere abstinent. "Non est" autem, inquit, "regnum Dei cibus est potus."[58]

Rom. 14:17 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Atqui hic ipse exclamavit: "Non est regnum Dei esca et potus: "neque vero abstinentia a vino et carnibus; "sed justitia, et pax, et gaudium in Spiritu sancto."[76]

Rom. 14:17 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Prayer

nor a sad by a joyful,[80]

Rom. 14:17 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Fasting

And if he has "delivered you the keys of the meat-market," permitting the eating of "all things" with a view to establishing the exception of" things offered to idols; "still he has not included the kingdom of God in the meat-market: "For," he says, "the kingdom of God is neither meat nor drink; "[103]

Rom. 14:17 - NIV, NAB - in Cyprian Treatise XII Three Books of Testimonies Against the Jews

Also to the Romans: "The kingdom of God is not meat and drink, but righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost."[688]

Rom. 14:17 - NIV, NAB - in Novation On the Jewish Meats

The apostle cries out: "The kingdom of God is not meat and drink, but righteousness, and peace. and joy."[25]

Rom. 14:19 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Sed et qui utitur, "cum gratiarum actione,"[152]

Rom. 14:20 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria The Instructor Book II

Only let him partake temperately, not dependent on them, nor gaping after fine fare. For a voice will whisper to him, saying, "Destroy not the work of God for the sake of food."[33]

Rom. 14:20 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Fasting

a home-thrust, detractors as you are of this observance: "Do not for the sake of food," he says, "undo[101]

Rom. 14:20 - NIV, NAB - in Didache

bear what thou art able; but against that which is sacrificed to idols[71]

Rom. 14:21 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria The Instructor Book II

neither in discourse or food are we to join, looking with suspicion on the pollution thence proceeding, as on the tables of the demons. "It is good, then, neither to eat flesh nor to drink wine,"[32]

Rom. 14:21 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Scriptum est enim: "Bonum est carnero non coinedere, nec vinum bibere, si quis comedat per offendiculum."[150]

Rom. 14:21 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book VIII

We do not indeed deny that the divine word does seem to command something similar to this, when to raise us to a higher and purer life it says, "It is good neither to eat flesh, nor to drink wine, nor anything whereby thy brother stumbleth, or is offended, or is made weak; "[54]

Rom. 14:23 - NIV, NAB - in Dionysius Extant Fragments Part I

in this matter or not. And he that doubteth in the matter of meats, the apostle tells us, "is damned if he eat."[164]

Rom. 14:23 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XI

as for us who know that some things are used by demons, or if we do not know, but suspect, and are in doubt about it, if we use such things, we have used them not to the glory of God, nor in the name of Christ; for not only does the suspicion that things have been sacrificed to idols condemn him who eats, but even the doubt concerning this; for "he that doubteth," according to the Apostle, "is condemned if he eat, because he eateth not of faith; and whatsoever is not of faith is sin."[103]

Rom. 14:23 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XI

And the saying is I think, not to be despised, and on this account, demands clear exposition, which seems to me to be thus; as it is not the meat but the conscience of him who eats with doubt which defiles him that eateth, for "he that doubteth is condemned if he eat, because he eateth not of faith,"[136]