romans

Rom. 7:1 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian To His Wife Book II

.[7]

Rom. 7:1 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Monogamy

Accordingly, it will be without cause that you will say that God wills not a divorced woman to be joined to another man "while her husband liveth," as if He do will it "when he is dead; "[80]

Rom. 7:1 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XII

Now that the law is husband of the soul Paul clearly exhibits in the Epistle to the Romans, saying, "The law hath dominion over a man for so long time as he liveth; for the woman that hath a husband is bound to the husband while he liveth, to the husband who is law,"[22]

Rom. 7:2 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Monogamy

If, however, the husband shall have died, she has been freed from (his) law, (so) that she is not an adulteress if made (wife) to another husband."[94]

Rom. 7:2 - NIV, NAB - in The Second Epistle of Pope Callistus

Wherefore the apostle says: "The wife is bound by the law so long as her husband liveth; but if he be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband."[8]

Rom. 7:2 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XII

So far then because of the saying, "But if the husband die she is discharged from the law, the husband," and because of this, "so then, while her husband liveth, she shall be called an adulteress, if she be joined to another man," and because of this, "but if the husband die, she is free from the law, so that she is no adulteress though she be joined to another man."[26]

Rom. 7:3 - NIV, NAB - in Shepherd of Hermas Commandment Fourth

And I said, "If a wife or husband die, and the widower or widow marry, does he or she commit sin? ""There is no sin in marrying again," said he; "but if they remain unmarried, they gain greater honour and glory with the Lord; but if they marry, they do not sin.[15]

Rom. 7:4 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Vivit enim lex, cum sit spiritalis, et gnostice intelligatur: nos autem "mortui" sumus "legi per corpus Christi, ut gigneremur alteri, qui resurrrexit ex mortuis," qui praedictus fuit a lege, "ut Deo fructificaremus."[144]

Rom. 7:4 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

"Et vos ergo mortui estis legi per corpus Christi, ut vos gigneremini alteri, qui surrexit a mortuis."[148]

Rom. 7:4 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

so that none could glory through it, in order that grace might be maintained to the glory of the Christ, not of the Creator, but of Marcion! I may here anticipate a remark about the substance of Christ, in the prospect of a question which will now turn up. For he says that "we are dead to the law."[634]

Rom. 7:4 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

whom he immediately after states to have been "raised from the dead,"[637]

Rom. 7:6 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book IV

yet "without the law sin was dead,"[9]

Rom. 7:6 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Monogamy

For when we were in the flesh, the passions of sin, which (passions) used to be efficiently caused through the law, (wrought) in our members unto the bearing of fruit to death; but now we have been emancipated from the law, being dead (to that) in which we used to be held,[95]

Rom. 7:7 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Sed peccatum non cognovi, nisi per legem. Concupiscentiam enim non cognovissem, nisi lex diceret: Non concupisces."[125]

Rom. 7:7 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

But, behold, he bears testimony to the law, and excuses it on the ground of sin: "What shall we say, therefore? Is the law sin? God forbid."[640]

Rom. 7:7 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

"God forbid!" (See how) the apostle recoils from all impeachment of the law. I, however, have no acquaintance with sin except through the law.[641]

Rom. 7:7 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

For how should one care for a thing which is neither forbidden nor necessary to him? And for this reason it is said, "I had not known lust, except the law had said, Thou shalt not covet."[61]

Rom. 7:8 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

It was not the law, therefore, which led me astray, but "sin, taking occasion by the commandment."[643]

Rom. 7:8 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

For when the law was given, the devil had it in his power to work lust in me; "for without the law, sin was dead; "[63]

Rom. 7:8 - NIV, NAB - in 2 Clement

Wherefore, brethren, having received no small occasion[121]

Rom. 7:8 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on John Book II

The question is whether evil, also, was made through the Logos, taking the Logos, now be it well noted, in the sense of that reason which is in every one, as thus brought into being by the reason which was from the beginning. The Apostle says:[40]

Rom. 7:9 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book III

For wickedness must necessarily first exist in men. As Paul also says, "When the commandment came, sin revived, and I died."[192]

Rom. 7:9 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Let us see, then, what it is that we have endeavoured to say respecting the apostle. For this saying of his, "I was alive without the law once,"[60]

Rom. 7:9 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

" But I was alive and blameless before the law, having no commandment in accordance with which it was necessary to live; "but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died. And the commandment, which was ordained to life, I found to be unto death."[64]

Rom. 7:9 - NIV, NAB - in The First Epistle of Clement Concerning Virginity

"Whosoever, therefore, has not the Spirit of God in him, is none of His: "[79]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria The Instructor Book I

" And that he knows that what is just is good, appears by his saying, "So that the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good,"[175]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Quare "lex quidera est sancta, et mandatum sanctum, et justurn, et bonum."[145]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book IV

Wherefore the law is productive of the emotion of fear. "So that the law is holy," and in truth "spiritual,"[13]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Who is the Rich Man that Shall Be Saved?

Jesus, accordingly, does not charge him with not having fulfilled all things out of the law, but loves him, and fondly welcomes his obedience in what he had learned; but says that he is not perfect as respects eternal life, in as much as he had not fulfilled what is perfect, and that he is a doer indeed of the law, but idle at the true life. Those things, indeed, are good. Who denies it? For "the commandment is holy,"[9]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Modesty

converting souls; the statutes of the Lord (are) direct, delighting hearts; the precept of the Lord far-shining, enlightening eyes." Thus, too, the apostle: "And so the law indeed is holy, and the precept holy and most good"[60]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Origen de Principiis Book II

The Apostle Paul makes use of no circumlocution, when he says, "The law is good; and the commandment is holy, and just, and good."[66]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book VII

But when in another place he wishes to praise and recommend the law, he calls it "spiritual," and says, "We know that the law is spiritual; "and, "Wherefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good."[32]

Rom. 7:12 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

"Wherefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just and good; "[66]

Rom. 7:13 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

Why then do you, (O Marcion, ) impute to the God of the law what His apostle dares not impute even to the law itself? Nay, he adds a climax: "The law is holy, and its commandment just and good."[644]

Rom. 7:13 - NIV, NAB - in Origen de Principiis Book II

And that he might show more clearly that goodness was in the commandment to a greater degree than justice and holiness, repeating his words, he used, instead of these three epithets, that of goodness alone, saying, "Was then that which is good made death unto me? God forbid."[67]

Rom. 7:13 - NIV, NAB - in Origen de Principiis Book II

alone. But in those which follow he says, "Sin wrought death in me by that which is good,"[68]

Rom. 7:13 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

because it was given, not for injury, but for safety; for let us not suppose that God makes anything useless or hurtful. What thou? "Was then that which is good made death unto me? "[67]

Rom. 7:14 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

? "Then, again, when affirming the law to be "spiritual"[645]

Rom. 7:14 - NIV, NAB - in Novation On the Jewish Meats

Therefore, first of all, we must avail ourselves of that passage, "that the law is spiritual; "[10]

Rom. 7:14 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

" For it was not the law of God that became the cause of my being brought into subjection to corruption, but the devil; that he might be made manifested who, through that which is good, wrought evil; that the inventor of evil might become and be proved the greatest of all sinners. "For we know that the law is spiritual; "[68]

Rom. 7:14 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

and therefore it can in no respect be injurious to any one; for spiritual things are far removed from irrational lust and sin. "But I am carnal, sold under sin; "[69]

Rom. 7:14 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on John Book X

On the same passage one may also make use of such an example as that of Paul, who at one place[13]

Rom. 7:14 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XI

and which had no kinship with the spirit, and the ministration of life which is understood in the spiritual law. those who were able with a sincere heart to say, "We know that the law is spiritual,"[132]

Rom. 7:15 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Wherefore even the sainted Paul says," For what I would, that do I not, but what I would not, that I do; "[57]

Rom. 7:15 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Hence evil, as though besieging me, cleaves to me and dwells in me, justice giving me up to be sold to the Evil One, in consequence of having violated the law. Therefore also the expressions: "That which I do, I allow not," and "what I hate, that do I,"[71]

Rom. 7:15 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. For I know that in me-that is, in my flesh-dwelleth no good thing."[80]

Rom. 7:15 - NIV, NAB - in Lactantius Divine Institutes Book IV

and hold out his hand to one who is about to follow? But how can one practise what he teaches, unless he is like him whom he teaches? For if he be subject to no passion, a man may thus answer him who is the teacher: It is my wish not to sin, but I am overpowered; for I am clothed with frail and weak flesh: it is this which covets, which is angry, which fears pain and death. And thus I am led on against my will;[329]

Rom. 7:17 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Prius enim dixit: "Sed inhabitarts in me peccatum; "propter quod consentaneum erat dicere illud: "Non habitat in came mea bonum."[127]

Rom. 7:17 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On the Resurrection of the Flesh

-that, surely, which he previously mentioned as dwelling in our members.[312]

Rom. 7:18 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book III

is the sign of our salvation, since it was the Lord Himself who saved them, because they could not be saved by their own instrumentality; and, therefore, when Paul sets forth human infirmity, he says: "For I know that there dwelleth in my flesh no good thing,"[388]

Rom. 7:18 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book IV

"to will is present with him, but he finds not means to perform"[593]

Rom. 7:18 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Quod si ii, qui sunt diversae sententiae, repugnantes, existiment Paulum verba sua dirigentem adversus Creatorem, dixisse ea, quae deinceps sequuntur: "Novi enim, quod non habitat in me, hoc est, in came mea, bonum; "[126]

Rom. 7:18 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Of Patience

which I am all unfit, being a man of no goodness;[2]

Rom. 7:18 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On Modesty

"For as ye have tendered your members to servile impurity and iniquity, so too now tender them servants to righteousness unto holiness." For even if he has affirmed that "good dwelleth not in his flesh,"[192]

Rom. 7:19 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Therefore it is in our power to will not to think these things; but not to bring it about that they shall pass away, so as not to come into the mind again; for this does not lie in our power, as I said; which is the meaning of that statement, "The good that I would, I do not; "[72]

Rom. 7:19 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

But if any one should venture to oppose this statement, and reply, that the apostle teaches that we hate not only the evil which is in thought, but that we do that which we will not, and we hate it even in the very act of doing it, for he says," The good which I would, I do not; but the evil which I would not, that I do; "[75]

Rom. 7:20 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

Consequenter subjunxit: "Si autem quod nolo, hoc ego facio, non utique ego id operor, sed quod inhabitat in me peccatum: "quod "repugnans," inquit, "legi" Dei et "mentis meae, captivat me in lege peccati, quae est in membris meis. Miser ego homo, quis me liberabit de corpore morris hujus? "[128]

Rom. 7:20 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On the Resurrection of the Flesh

-not the flesh in sin, for the house is not to be condemned with its inhabitant. He said, indeed, that "sin dwelleth in our body."[315]

Rom. 7:22 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

And the same is denoted by the words, "For I delight in the law of God after the inward man; but I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members. O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? "[84]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian Against Marcion Book V

For he in a previous verse ascribed sin to the flesh, and made it out to be "the law of sin dwelling in his members," and "warring against the law of the mind."[647]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Tertullian On the Resurrection of the Flesh

-that other law, no doubt, which he has described "in his members as warring against the law of his mind,"[386]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Origen de Principiis Book III

And it is with respect to this that they think the apostle uttered the words: "I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members."[351]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Origen de Principiis Book III

The declaration also of the apostle, "I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind,"[369]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

One the law which arises from the assault of evil, and which often draws on the soul to lustful fancies, which, he says," wars against the law of the mind."[81]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

And the third, which is in accordance with sin, settled in the flesh from lust, which he calls the "law of sin which dwells in our members; "[82]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XII

For if there are two laws, the law in our members warring against the law of the mind, and the law of the mind,[20]

Rom. 7:23 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Commentary on Matthew Book XII

In a general way, then, the law in the members which wars against the law of the mind,[28]

Rom. 7:24 - NIV, NAB - in Irenaeus Against Heresies Book III

showing that the "good thing" of our salvation is not from us, but from God. And again: "Wretched man that I am, who shall deliver me from the body of this death? "[389]

Rom. 7:24 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book III

" Nunquid autem consentit cum divino Apostolo, qui dicit: "Infelix ego homo, quis me liberabit a corpore mortis hujus? "[16]

Rom. 7:24 - NIV, NAB - in Clement of Alexandria Stromata Book IV

"For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it."[69]

Rom. 7:24 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book VII

and similarly, "Who will deliver me from the body of this death? "[125]

Rom. 7:24 - NIV, NAB - in Origen Against Celsus Book VIII

" We are, then, indulging in no baseless calumnies against demons, but are condemning their agency upon earth as destructive to mankind, and show that, under cover of oracles and bodily cures, and such other means, they are seeking to separate from God the soul which has descended to this "body of humiliation; "and those who feel this humiliation exclaim, "0 wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? "[109]

Rom. 7:24 - NIV, NAB - in The Teaching of Addaeus the Apostle

For He it is that confounded the tongues of the presumptuous in this region who were before us; and He it is that teaches at this day the faith of truth and verity by us, humble and despicable[15]

Rom. 7:25 - NIV, NAB - in Methodius From the Discourse on the Resurrection

And he immediately adds, clearly showing from what kind of death he desired to be delivered, and who he was who delivered him, "I thank God, through Jesus Christ."[85]